(01) 254 8300

(01) 254 8300

FAQ’s

How Is Non-Surgical Spinal Decompression Performed?

As a general rule, Spinal Decompression Therapy uses computer-controlled pulling forces to decompress a specific part of the spine, reducing pressure off of the nerves and discs. Spinal Decompression also aids in stretching tight muscles and stiff ligaments.

How Quickly Does Spinal Decompression Work?

As a general rule, nearly 20% of patients report pain relief after the first week. Two to three weeks later, about 40% will have significant relief. For the remaining 20%, considerable relief will occur between four to six weeks later.

Is It Good to Decompress Your Back?

As a general rule, the benefits of Spinal Decompression can be gained by anyone with a herniated disc or a disc injury due to degenerative disease. Because it increases blood circulation to the spine, it helps dislocated spines return to their original position.

How Often Should You Do Spinal Decompression?

As a general rule, most spinal decompression treatments require 12-20 sessions over four to six weeks. Some conditions may require fewer or more sessions. After completing their prescribed treatment program, most patients report significant pain relief after the first few treatment sessions.

What Causes Low Back Pain?

As a general rule, the most common cause of back pain is intervertebral disc degeneration and herniation. Nerves become irritated when disc protrusions irritate them, resulting in pain or numbness.

Who Is a Good Candidate for Spinal Decompression?

As a general rule, spinal decompression therapy can treat most people who suffer from various back problems. At first, Spinal Decompression was slowly accepted, but many people found that it was less invasive and more effective than they had anticipated before treatment. 

Who Is a Not a Good Candidate for Spinal Decompression?

As a general rule, people who are not good candidates for non-surgical Spinal Decompression are the following:

  • Surgical devices, such as pedicle screws and rods
  • During pregnancy 
  • Recent prior lumbar fusion
  • Having metastatic cancer
  • A severe case of osteoporosis
  • Spinal spondylolisthesis (unstable)
  • An injury to the lumbar spine below L-1 has recently occurred.
  • Defect in pars
  • Aortic aneurysm.
  • Abdominal or pelvic cancer
  • Infections of the discs
  • Peripheral neuropathy severe
  • A hemiplegic, paraplegic, or cognitively impaired person

To qualify for spinal decompression therapy, you must meet the following criteria:

  • Herniated and bulging discs in the lumbar spine caused persistent pain for over four weeks
  • Recurrent back pain resulted from an old back surgery over six months ago.
  • A degenerated disc caused constant pain that failed to respond to therapy for four weeks.
  • In the four-week treatment protocol, patients are available for treatment.
  • At least 18 years of age is required.

Do the Spinal Decompression Treatments Have Side Effects?

As a general rule, most patients do not experience side effects with Spinal Decompression. However, there have been instances of mild muscle spasms in the past.

Do Patients Risk Any Harm During a Spinal Decompression?

As a general rule, patients are entirely safe and comfortable during Spinal Decompression. An emergency stop switch is provided for both patients and operators. A switch (required by FDA) immediately stops the treatment, preventing injuries.

What is the difference between Spinal Decompression and Ordinary Spinal Traction?

A herniated or degenerative disc may cause some of the symptoms treated by traction. Traction, however, does not treat the underlying cause. In Spinal Decompression, a negative pressure is created inside the disc. Due to this, the disc pulls in the herniation, allowing the body’s fibroblastic response to rehydrate the disc and heal the injury. With inversion and traction tables, it is possible to reduce intradiscal pressure between +95 and +35 mmHg at best. Decompression of the spine can reduce intradiscal pressure by 155 to 190 mmHg. In response to muscle stretching, the body causes painful muscle spasms that exacerbate the pain.

Can I Have Spinal Decompression if I Had Spinal Surgery?

As a general rule, Spinal Decompression therapy usually is not recommended for those who have undergone spinal surgery. After undergoing a failed back surgery, many patients have found success with Spinal Decompression.

What Causes Low Back Pain?

Low back pain can be caused by a number of factors, including injuries and ageing.

A vertebra is made of bone that protects the spine. Each vertebra has a soft disc and a layer of ligaments covering its outer layer. The spine and vertebrae are protected by these discs, which act as shock absorbers.

Degeneration and herniated intervertebral discs often cause back pain.

As a general rule, It is common for back pain to be caused by intervertebral disc degeneration and herniation. By protruding from discs, nerves become irritated, resulting in pain or numbness.

How Long to Feel Results?

The majority of patients report a reduction in pain after the first few sessions. The majority of improvements occur after the second week.

How Long Does the Spinal Decompression Treatment Take?

The patient remains on the system daily for the first two weeks, once a week for the next two weeks, and twice a week for the last two weeks.

Am I Eligible for Spinal Decompression Treatment?

Doctors and patients alike have come to me with questions regarding the types of cases that Spinal Decompression spinal disc decompression will most effectively help since I started using it. In order to achieve the best possible outcomes, it is crucial that the proper patient selection be followed, so let me explain the Inclusion and Exclusion criteria so you may make an informed decision because not everyone can benefit from Spinal Decompression treatment.

For inclusion, you must meet the following criteria:

  • A bulging and herniated lumbar disc caused persistent pain for over four weeks
  • An old back surgery that failed to resolve recurrent pain over six months ago.
  • A degenerated disc causing persistent pain that did not respond to therapy for four weeks.
  • During the four-week treatment protocol, patients are available for treatment.
  • The patient must be at least 18 years of age.

Exclusion criteria:

  • Surgical devices, such as pedicle screws and rods
  • During pregnancy 
  • Spinal fusion
  • Recent prior lumbar fusion
  • Blood Clots
  • Diseased spinal nerve roots
  • Having metastatic cancer
  • A severe case of osteoporosis
  • Spinal spondylolisthesis (unstable)
  • An injury to the lumbar spine below L-1 has recently occurred.
  • Defect in pars
  • Aortic aneurysm.
  • Abdominal or pelvic cancer
  • Infections of the discs
  • Peripheral neuropathy severe
  • A hemiplegic, paraplegic, or cognitively impaired person

Do the Treatments Have Side Effects?

Side effects are rare in most patients. However, there have been some cases of mild muscle spasms in the past.

During Spinal Decompression, How Is Each Vertebra Separated and Deduced to a Specific Level?

When combining spinal positioning with varying degrees and intensities of force, decompression is achieved. In order to achieve this, a logarithmic curve is used to create a gentle pull. By producing distraction forces on a logarithmic curve, typical proprioceptor responses are avoided. In doing so, targeted decompression occurs.

Do Patients Risk Any Harm During a Spinal Decompression?

Spinal decompression is completely safe and comfortable for all subjects. Both the patient and the operator have emergency stop switches. The switches (required by FDA) stop the treatment immediately, preventing any injuries.

What Is the Difference Between Spinal Decompression and Ordinary Spinal Traction?

Traction can treat some of the symptoms caused by herniated or degenerative discs. However, it does not treat the cause of the problem. During spinal decompression, there is a negative pressure inside the disc. As a result, the disc pulls in the herniation, and the increase in negative pressure allows the body’s fibroblastic response to heal the injury and rehydrate the disc as a result. Inversion and traction tables can, at best, lower intradiscal pressures between +90 and +30 mmHg. Spinal decompression can reduce intradiscal pressures between -150 and -200 mmHg. When traction occurs, the body’s reaction to stretching is to cause painful muscle spasms that aggravate the pain.

A Can Spinal Decompression Be Applied to Patients Who Have Had Spinal Surgery?

The treatment of spinal decompression is normally not contra-indicated for those who have undergone spinal surgery. Many patients have found success with Spinal Decompression after a failed back surgery.

Who Is Not Suitable for Spinal Decompression Therapy?

People with recent spinal fractures, surgical fusions, metallic hardware, spinal infections, or moderate to severe osteoporosis.

Who Is a Candidate for Spinal Decompression?

We can help anyone who has been told they need surgery but wishes to avoid it, anyone who has been told there is nothing more available to help, anyone who has been unable to find relief from conservative options (medications, physical therapy, injections, chiropractic, acupuncture), or anyone who still experiences pain but wishes to receive the type of treatment they desire.

 

 

 

Book Your Spinal Decompression Consultation Today!

For more information or to book your appointment, call us at (01) 254 8300 or click fill out the form below.


    Low backNeckButtocksHip(s)Leg(s)



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